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10 Proven Health Benefits of Eggs (No. 1 is Definitely My Favorite)


Eggs are among the few foods that I would classify as “superfoods.”

They are loaded with nutrients, some of which are rare in the modern diet.

Here are 10 health benefits of eggs that have been confirmed in human studies.

1. Eggs Are Incredibly Nutritious

Eggs are among the most nutritious foods on the planet.

A whole egg contains all the nutrients required to turn a single cell into a baby chicken.

A single large boiled egg contains (1):

  • Vitamin A: 6% of the RDA.
  • Folate: 5% of the RDA.
  • Vitamin B5: 7% of the RDA.
  • Vitamin B12: 9% of the RDA.
  • Vitamin B2: 15% of the RDA.
  • Phosphorus: 9% of the RDA.
  • Selenium: 22% of the RDA.
  • Eggs also contain decent amounts of Vitamin D, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Vitamin B6, Calcium and Zinc.

This is coming with 77 calories, 6 grams of protein and 5 grams of healthy fats.

Eggs also contain various other trace nutrients that are important for health.

Really… eggs are pretty much the perfect food, they contain a little bit of almost every nutrient we need.

If you can get your hands on pastured or Omega-3 enriched eggs, then these areeven better. They have more Omega-3s and are much higher in Vitamin A and E (2,3).

Bottom Line: Whole eggs are among the most nutritious foods on the planet, containing a little bit of almost every nutrient we need. Omega-3 enriched and/or pastured eggs are even healthier.

2. Eggs Are High in Cholesterol, But They Don’t Adversely Affect Blood Cholesterol

It is true that eggs are high in cholesterol.

In fact, a single egg contains 212 mg, which is over half of the recommended daily intake of 300 mg.

However… it’s important to keep in mind that cholesterol in the diet doesn’t necessarily raise cholesterol in the blood (4, 5).

The liver actually produces large amounts of cholesterol every single day. When we eat more eggs, the liver just produces less cholesterol instead, so it evens out (6, 7).

The response to egg consumption varies between individual (8):

  • In 70% of people, eggs don’t raise cholesterol at all.
  • In the other 30% (termed “hyper responders”), eggs can mildly raise Total and LDL cholesterol.

However, as I will outline later in the article, the situation is a bit more complicated than that and these changes are actually beneficial.

(Exceptions… people with genetic disorders like familial hypercholesterolemia or a gene type called ApoE4 may want to minimize or avoid eggs.).

Bottom Line: Eggs are high in cholesterol, but eating eggs does not have adverse effects on cholesterol in the blood for the majority of people.

3. Eggs Raise HDL (The “Good”) Cholesterol

HDL stands for High Density Lipoprotein. It is often known as the “good” cholesterol (9).

People who have higher levels of HDL usually have a lower risk of heart disease, stroke and various health problems (10, 11, 12, 13).

Eating eggs is a great way to increase HDL.

In one study, 2 eggs per day for 6 weeks increased HDL levels by 10% (14, 15, 16).

Bottom Line: Egg consumption consistently leads to elevated levels of HDL (the “good”) cholesterol, which is linked to a reduced risk of many diseases.

4. Eggs Contain Choline – an Important Nutrient That Most People Don’t Get Enough of

Choline is a nutrient that most people don’t even know exists.

Yet, it is an incredibly important substance and is often grouped with the B vitamins.

Choline is used to build cell membranes and has a role in producing signalling molecules in the brain, along with various other functions (17).

Dietary surveys have shown that about 90% of people in the U.S. are getting less than the recommended amount of choline (18).

Whole eggs are an excellent source


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