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The Israeli who goes undercover to save Syrian lives

Israeli volunteers are passing critical humanitarian supplies to Syrian NGOs in a dangerous cross-border operation that helps hundreds of thousands of desperate Syrians.


Several times a year, often more, Doreen Gold, an Israeli Jew, goes undercover to organize a mission of humanitarian aid for Syrian NGOs. From there the aid is delivered to the increasingly desperate and starving people of Syria, an enemy nation still reeling from a brutal and deadly civil war that may, or may not, be nearly over.

She’s not alone. Some 200 or so Israeli volunteers working for her nonprofit, Il4Syrians, have also been operating in stealth mode since the revolution began in 2011.

It’s a dangerous job for anyone, but for Israelis the consequences of exposure are unthinkable. Doreen, whose name has been changed to hide her identity, has signed a form that says that if she is captured, the government will not negotiate for her release. It’s a form that all of her volunteers – Arab, Jewish, Christian and Druze – must fill in before they leave on a mission.

“It is frightening,” Doreen, a mother of two, tells ISRAEL21c. “It’s always frightening. We know we are on our own.”

Doreen, who is 47, is no stranger to danger zones. Since 1994, she has been giving aid in some of the worst humanitarian disasters of the last couple of decades. The tsunami in Southeast Asia, devastating flooding in Chechnya, the earthquake in Haiti. She’s responded to crises in Iraq, Pakistan, Indonesia, Rwanda and Darfur.

When the revolution began in Syria in March 2011, she knew immediately that she had to help. A month later, Il4Syrians was on the ground. “We were probably the first international NGO operating in the area,” Doreen tells ISRAEL21c. “At that point people didn’t realise how deadly the conflict was. They still called it demonstrations, not a revolution, but we had already figured out that the number of casualties was enormous.”

A conflict that is close to home

Living in the north of Israel, the conflict was close to home. “We could hear the noise of the bombs and explosions from Syria. It was really shocking,” she says.

The first mission brought in sanitation kits, baby powder, food and medical supplies. Since then the organization has stepped up its work, passing along food, medicines, survival kits, medical devices and even – on one mission – 3,000 chemical suits to protect the doctors working with patients who had been victims of chemical attacks.

Aside from these basic supplies, the organization also supports 17 field hospitals and surgery rooms in Syria, all manned by Syrian NGOs. Doreen’s team keeps them stocked with everything they need, ranging from sterilisation equipment to anaesthetics and medicine.

The volunteers train and equip Syrian aides in firefighting and search-and-rescue missions – particularly searching for people under the rubble of bombings. “We discovered that most victims suffer smoke inhalation or burns because bombings trigger explosions in the gas cooking systems. It means there’s a serious need for firefighters there,” says Doreen.

The organisation has also provided four 3D printers to Syria and trained 22 orthopaedic doctors to print out prosthetic limbs.

Convoys go once every one to three months, depending on funding. The Israeli volunteers all speak Arabic fluently, and have cover stories for protection. “Missions are short and pinpointed,” says Doreen.

Bodies buried under rubble

As the years of Syria’s increasingly brutal conflict have worn on and more of the country has been swept into the war, things have changed dramatically. “Everything used to be clear and organised, and due to tight relations with very committed Syrian NGOs, aid could reach almost any point in Syria, but now it’s limited to specific areas,” admits Doreen. “Initially every territory had civilian leaders; now there are only military leaders who aren’t just in charge of fighting, but all the infrastructure of civilian life.

“In the beginning it was a beautiful country, but it has changed,” she continues. “Buildings are gone, clinics have been bombed, and people are missing. You cannot believe the magnitude of the disaster, or the poverty. Everywhere you go there’s a smell of death. There are bodies still trapped under the rubble. There’s nothing you can do.”

But the worst thing, she says, is what’s happening to the people. “At the start they were anxious to create a change; now


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